Jennifer Aniston admits she put Brad Pitt’s needs before her own

If she could, Jennifer Aniston would do a couple of things differently in her marriage to Brad Pitt

Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston’s marriage is perhaps one of the most talked-about events in Hollywood.

And despite the marriage hitting the rocks, the Friends actor most definitely does no regret her marriage with the Fight Club star.

However, if she could, she would do a couple of things differently, as revealed by the 51-year-old during an interview with the Vanity Fair earlier.

“There’s a lot I would probably do differently. I’d take more vacations—getting away from work, enjoying each other in different environments. But there was always something preventing it; either he was working or I was.”

“I wouldn’t give over so much of myself, which I did at times. It was that thing about being a nurturer; I love taking care of people, and I definitely put his needs before mine sometimes. It’s seamless; somewhere along the way, you sort of lose yourself.

“You just don’t know when it happens. It’s such an insidious thing, you don’t really see where it started—and where you ended.

“There’s no one to blame but yourself. I’ve always been that way in relationships, even with my mom. It’s not the healthiest. I feel like I’ve broken the pattern now. I’ll never let myself down like that again. I feel like my sense of self is being strengthened because of it.”

However, after the couple parted ways, the Murder Mystery actor learnt how to be dependent on herself and enjoy being alone.

“It’s beautiful here; I love it. I’ve always wanted to have a little Malibu beach house, and it feels good. I’m enjoying simplifying things… Brad and I used to joke that every piece of furniture was either a museum piece or just uncomfortable,” she recalled.

“He definitely had his sense of style, and I definitely have my sense of style, and sometimes they clashed. I wasn’t so much into modern.”

She further revealed how in spite of how things went between her and Brad, she does not wish to live with tag of a victim. “I don’t feel like a victim. I’ve worked with this therapist for a long time, and her major focus is that you get one day of being a victim—and that’s it. Then we take responsibility for our own input. To live in a victim place is pointing a finger at someone else, as if you have no control. Relationships are two people; everyone is accountable.”

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